All Feeds | XSL | RSS | Embed | Edit
RSS Viewer Boing Boing
  • Trump meets with military drone makers and VCs

    President Donald Trump today “offered support for emerging technologies including unmanned aerial vehicles and next-generation wireless networks in a meeting on Thursday with the chiefs of AT&T Inc and General Electric Co and other business leaders,” reports Reuters.

    At the White House today, Trump met with venture capitalists, and with telcom and drone executives, and they talked about how the federal government can speed technologies to market.

    [caption id="attachment_531164" align="alignnone" width="702"] U.S. President Donald Trump (C) holds an event highlighting emerging technologies, in the East Room at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst[/caption]

    The meeting, which lasted more than three hours including breakout sessions, is part of Trump's effort to tap industry experts on how to boost U.S. competitiveness in various fields and create jobs. On Monday, Trump met with the heads of 18 U.S. technology companies including Apple Inc, Amazon.com Inc and Microsoft Corp, seeking their help to make the government's computing systems more efficient. He will meet with energy industry leaders next week.

    "We want them to create new companies and lots of jobs," Trump told the executives on Thursday. "We're going to give you the competitive advantage that you need."

    In attendance were chief executives of several drone companies including Kespry Inc, AirMap, Airspace Inc, Measure UAS Inc, Trumbull Unmanned, and PrecisionHawk Inc.

    Drone makers argued that the administration should move faster to approve broader commercial use of drones and noted that the Transportation Department does not require automakers to win pre-approval of self-driving vehicle technologies. Senior executives at Xcel Energy Inc, Verizon Communications Inc and CenturyLink Inc also took part. Venture capital firms included Revolution LLC, headed by AOL co-founder Steve Case, 500 Startups, Cayuga Ventures, Epic Ventures and Lightspeed Ventures.

    Obama administration rules opened the skies to low-level small drones for education, research and routine commercial use. The Trump administration is considering whether to expand drone use for deliveries beyond the view of an operator. Security issues would need to be addressed.

    PHOTO, TOP: U.S. President Donald Trump (L) looks at a drone with Kespry CEO George Mathew (R) during an event highlighting emerging technologies, in the East Room at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

    And in the department of interesting timing:

    U.S. set to approve India's purchase of drones before Modi visit

    The United States is expected to approve India's purchase of a naval variant of the Predator drone, a source familiar with the situation said, as Prime Minister Narendra Modi tries to revitalize relations with Washington when he meets President Donald Trump for the first time.

    Securing agreement on the purchase of 22 unarmed drones is seen in New Delhi as a key test of defense ties that flourished under former President Barack Obama but have drifted under Trump, who has courted Asian rival China as he seeks Beijing's help to contain North Korea's nuclear program.

    The deal would still require approval by Congress. California-based General Atomics, the maker of the Guardian drone sought by India, declined to comment.

    [caption id="attachment_531168" align="alignnone" width="724"] U.S. President Donald Trump (L) meets with technology and telecommunications executives, including Dyan Gibbens from Trumbull Unmanned and Darius Adamczyk (R) from Honeywell, at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst[/caption]

    [caption id="attachment_531169" align="alignnone" width="780"] India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi addresses a gathering after he inaugurated Kochi Metro at a stadium in Kochi, India, June 17, 2017. REUTERS/Sivaram V/File Photo[/caption]

  • Yellowstone Grizzly Bear to be taken off Endangered Species list. Thanks, Trump.

    They've been on the Endangered Species list for 42 years. Today, Trump removed the Yellowstone grizzly bear's federal protections under the Endangered Species Act. The reason? A reported population rebound. The U.S. Department of Interior announced their plan to strip the grizzly's protections and return species oversight to the states.

    (more…)

  • Deleted Wikipedia articles with freaky titles

    Deleted Wikipedia articles with freaky titles is the best article on Wikipedia. From "Ç‹¬ç‰¹è§Â解" to Zombucks, with many oddities along the way (such as "☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼"), all that remains are the tantalizing names given to what were surely excellent, well-researched and not at all fannishly promotional entries for geeky obsessions.

    Here is the section for articles that began with "R".

    Radioactive Pedophile on the Loose!
    Random boner syndrome
    Raptor jesus
    Rat smacker
    Raving white octopus
    Reasons Why Many People Study in China
    Recombinant Human Dragon
    Rectal Anarchy
    Reducing your weight in a ver...
    References to polycephaly in popular culture
    Republic of Illinois
    Retard squad
    Richard's macaroni and cheese
    Rihno man super kidoonfire
    Rin-Din-Dinner
    Ross hutchison anal explosion
    Run 2 were u want run 2 were u want! im gonna catch u catch

    Digestif: Wikipedia: Silly Things

  • The $6 Ikea milk frother is terrific

    p>

    I have a nice espresso machine (a Rancilio Silvia) but I hate using the frother to make foamed milk for my cappuccino drinking guests. On our last trip to Ikea I bought this battery-powered milk frother. Wow, is it great. It whips up milk to a voluminous foam in a matter of seconds. It also makes matcha, cocoa, and butter-coffee with ease. Just stick the business end into the mug and turn on the switch. It's better, quieter and cheaper than one of those blender sticks. Amazon sells them for $6 including shipping. It takes 2AA batteries (not included).

  • Watch Trump saying he doesn't want a poor person working in his cabinet

    During his rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa yesterday, Trump says he doesn't want a poor person working in his cabinet. "I love all people – rich or poor -- but in those particular positions, I just don't want a poor person. Does that make sense? If you insist, I'll do it – but I like it better this way." I guess this explains why he has the richest cabinet in American history.

  • Burglar who trashes house found sleeping in bed

    When Jeff Hollbrook came home from work at 3:45am last Sunday, he found his house in complete disarray. So after calling the police, he began to record the damages – broken stained glass windows, furniture tossed around, a slept-in couch with a container of Kool-Aid next to it... he then goes upstairs and discovers the burglar in his bed. Thankfully the cops arrive shortly after and arrest the guy. When Hollbrook discovers the burglar it's like watching one of those faux-doc horror films, except this one is real.

  • Road rage causes a spectacular, horrifying accident

    Holy cow! How did the motorcycle stay up?!

  • Modding a recurve bow to make it quieter

    YouTuber Survival Lilly has tons of information on how to build a survival camp in any conditions. In this video, she mods a commercially available recurve bow for stealthier hunting. (more…)

  • These aesthetically pleasing “fruit cards” look good enough to eat

    On her Vegan-themed Instagram account Tropically Lina, Lina Saber uploads a delightful series called “fruit cards” where she arranges produce on paint card-style displays. I find these immensely satisfying to look at.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BUW3CHplys7/

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BT_rBV5FVps/

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BUJ-IvjF7Fv/

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BVSy9K5FXVb/

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BUjvEhalDgf/

  • LA Times accidentally reports 6.8 earthquake in Santa Barbara that happened in 1925

    Yesterday at 4:51pm The Los Angeles Times reported on a 6.8 earthquake in Santa Barbara. That's a shaker size that nobody would miss, and yet nobody felt it – because the earthquake happened 82 years ago.

    Usually human error is to blame on an erroneous news story, but in this case, the reporter was Quakebot, a robot that has been reporting on earthquakes since 2014. Quakebot almost always gets it right, but this time it accidentally reported on the 1925 Santa Barbara earthquake that killed 13 people and caused $8-million in damages.

    According to Gizmodo:

    The newspaper’s algorithm, called Quakebot, scrapes data from the US Geological Survey’s website. A USGS staffer at Caltech mistakenly sent out the alert when updating historical earthquake data to make it more precise.

    Seismologists have reportedly complained about some of the historical data being off by as much as 6 miles, and this staffer was simply updating the location of the old quake from 1925. But it shows how quickly misinformation can spread with just a few clicks.

  • How to break into an open garage

    This gentleman had a bit of difficulty breaking into a garage. Fortunately he found it easier to get back out.

  • John Oliver dared a coal exec to sue him, and now he's being sued

    Last week's John Oliver segment on Robert E. Murray, CEO of the coal mining Murray Energy Corporation, noted that Murray had a history of litigation against his critics in the news media, including the New York Times, and predicted that Murray would go on to sue Oliver (Murray's lawyers had sent Oliver a letter warning him about this possibility, and promising to pursue litigation to the nation's highest courts). (more…)

  • A safe-for-work, but extremely disturbing, supercut of egregious behavior

    I'm sorry, am I making you uncomfortable? from mildlyinfuriating

    The original poster should be reported and banned for this.

  • Getting stoned with the Weed Nuns

    Aubrey Plaza, who played April Ludgate on the NBC sitcom Parks and Recreation, sat down with the Sisters of the Valley (aka the Weed Nuns) and got really baked.

    From Wikipedia:

    Sisters of the Valley is a small business that sells cannabidiol tinctures and salves on the craft e-commerce website Etsy. It is based in Merced, California, and its proprietors follow a monastic motif, wearing religious habits and referring to each other as sisters, despite no affiliation with a religious order.

    #sistersofthevalley #cali #accidentalnun

    A post shared by Sisters of the Valley (@sistersofthevalley) on

    #sistersofthevalley #420 #cannabiscommunity #powerofhealing

    A post shared by Sisters of the Valley (@sistersofthevalley) on

  • Newt Gingrich admits Trump lied about taping Comey

    Ethically challenged former US Congressperson Newt Gingrich has proclaimed Donald Trump a liar. Gingrich claims there are no tapes of Trump strong-arming former FBI Director James Comey, it was an uncalculated bluff.

    President Trump is supposed to reveal this week, six weeks after making the initial suggestion, whether he actually has tapes of his White House conversations. Trump last month wielded those potential tapes as a very thinly veiled threat against former FBI director James B. Comey. And ever since then, he and the White House have decided to withhold the truth from the American people, refusing to answer a simple yes-or-no question.

    But Newt Gingrich just gave away the game, for all intents and purposes. In an interview with the Associated Press, the Trump-backing former House speaker basically admits that Trump was just bluffing to try to get inside Comey's head.

    “I think he was in his way instinctively trying to rattle Comey,” Gingrich said. “He's not a professional politician. He doesn't come back and think about Nixon and Watergate. His instinct is: 'I'll outbluff you.'”

    Apparently not being a “professional politician” is a license for dishonesty.

    Via WaPo

  • Is Amazon's water-resisting plastic bag for your phone better than a plain ol' Ziploc?

    Amazon offers this heavy plastic bag with a locking seal to let you use your phone in the water. Ziploc has long been my favorite beach case for my phone and kindle, wonder how they compare?

    This less than $3.00 plastic bag does a great job of keeping the sand and sea water off (or out) of my iPhone 7+. You can easily use the touch screen through the clear rubber surface, and take photos through the material.

    Alternatively, there is another better-known brand of plastic, well sealing bag that has served me well for years: the Ziploc Freezer Bag! I use them for sous vide, kids lunches, throwing crap in the freezer, and reading my kindle in a hot tub.

    Comparatively, the AmazonBasics is purpose built and will take more impact and abrasion than a Ziploc. The Amazon also has a handy lanyard, the only way I know of affixing the Ziploc to me is duct tape (duct people, duct.) I think the Ziploc freezer bag more reliably activates the button-less haptic button on my iPhone 7+, however.

    The price seems to float around on the Amazon bag. For $3 it is worth having around if you are going to spend a lot of time at the pool or beach.

    AmazonBasics Universal Waterproof Smartphone Pouch

    Ziploc Freezer Bag, Gallon, 28 Count via Amazon

  • Dangerous makeshift swimming pool on apartment balcony is a recipe for disaster

    Reddit folks have estimated that there's about 5,000 pounds of water in this makeshift wading pool. Will the balcony support it for long?

    Will the balcony resist the weight? from WTF
  • Lollipops that look like "creature eyeballs"

    Vintage Confections' $19 Creature Eyeball lollipop assortments come in an assortment of six flavors ("Blackberry, Marshmallow, Cotton candy, Green apple, Strawberry, Guava") and an assortment of creepy eyeball designs. (via Crazy Abalone)

  • A DRM-locked, $400 tea-brewing machine from the Internet of Shit timeline

    Did you buy a useless $400 "smart" juicer and now feel the need to accessorize it with more extrusions from the Internet of Shit timeline? Then The Leaf from Teaforia is just the thing: it's a tea-maker that uses DRM-locked tea-pods to brew tea in your kitchen so you don't have to endure the hassle of having the freedom to decide whose tea you brew in your tea-brewing apparatus, and so that you can contribute to the impending environmental apocalypse by generating e-waste every time you make a cup of tea. (more…)

  • Bank robbery goes awry

    In this security footage from a bank in Chapalita, Mexico, three masked men approach the doors with the clear intent to rob the place. A fleet-footed member of staff locks the glass doors. The masked men stand on the other side a little while, looking in at him. Then they walk off.

  • Tumblr is now owned by a phone company, so it's stopped fighting for Network Neutrality

    Yahoo's sale to Verizon means that Yahoo's sub-companies -- Flickr, Tumblr and a host of others -- are now divisions of a phone company, and as you might expect, being on the payroll of a notorious neutracidal maniac with a long history of sleazy, invasive, privacy-destroying, monopolistic, deceptive, anti-competitive, scumbag shakedowns has changed the public positions these companies are allowed to take. (more…)

  • Asia's toothpick crossbow fad is even worse than our fidget spinner fad

    We survived bottle flipping and fidget spinners, but will the next big fad be dangerous modded toothpick crossbows that shoot nails more than half the length of a football field? (more…)

  • A surprisingly detailed history of choker necklaces

    Beauty and fashion expert Safiya Nygaard digs into the long history of choker necklaces, which have been around since at least 2600 BC and have functioned as religious symbols, protective shielding, and, of course, fashion statements.

  • A history of artist Anish Kapoor and his assholic mission to own the color black

    Anish Kapoor is an artist and a colossal, controlling asshole: there was that time he said that the presence of his $270M sculpture in a Chicago park gave him the right to decide who could take pictures in a public space. (more…)

  • The concepts Frank Lloyd Wright never built

    Fallingwater, an hour out of Pittsburgh, is described as the world's most beautiful modern house. But fully half of architect Frank Lloyd Wright's fully-conceived masterpieces never left the drawing board.

    Wright designed 532 buildings that were made, and about the same number again that never were. His career spanned seven decades. His personal life was beset by chaos. He left his first wife Kittie, then in 1914 his partner Mamah Cheney was murdered alongside six other people by a domestic worker named Julian Carlton. His second wife, Miriam Noel, was a hopeless morphine addict. His third marriage, to Olgivanna, seems to have been all right. Wright famously said that, “not only do I fully intend to be the greatest architect who has yet lived, but fully intend to be the greatest architect who will ever live.” Walking around this show, a beautiful edifice built of the flotsam and jetsam of a long career, one realizes that even a man like that didn’t always get his way.

    My favorite FLW fantasy is The Illinois, a mile-high skyscraper that makes the Burj look like a Burger King.

  • Fun T-shirts with erasable chalkboards

    In this charming video, Giselle shows how easy it is to create a temporary masterpiece on a washable and erasable chalkboard t-shirt. (more…)

  • A kitchen assembly line makes packing lunch a breeze

    With a little prep, you can turn your kitchen into a convenient lunch assembly line for your kids or even just for yourself.

  • 'From the Ashes' examines coal's environmental devastation

    As the Trump Administration works to take America back to the coal age, From the Ashes takes an unflinching look at the industry's profound effect on the environment, with a focus on Appalachia. (more…)

  • A nuanced conversation about the biases against natural hair

    In this Allure video, model/writer/activist Ebonee Davis and actors Zazie Beetz and Dascha Polanco discuss the cultural bias against natural hair and the way it’s affected them on both a personal and professional level. As the accompanying article explains:

    For Allure’s April 2017 issue, 41 women of color were interviewed about how their appearance and how race played into their careers and experiences. Editor-in-chief Michelle Lee sat down with five women of color who come from various backgrounds in fashion, entertainment, and beauty, to talk about their experiences as women of color in their fields.

    Conversations about race in beauty can very often veer towards shared experiences as to how one’s racial identity and appearance affects everything in their lives from how they are treated to the success of their careers. Hair has categorically been a hot topic especially when it comes to natural hair textures for WOC. When what grows out of your head becomes a topic of political and socio-political discussion, it can’t help but affect your sense of identity as well as a large part of the experience being a person of color.

  • How hackers can steal your 2FA email account by getting you to sign up for another website

    In a paper for IEEE Security, researchers from Cyberpion and Israel's College of Management Academic Studies describe a "Password Reset Man-in-the-Middle Attack" that leverages a bunch of clever insights into how password resets work to steal your email account (and other kinds of accounts), even when it's protected by two-factor authentication. (more…)