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CycleliciousBicycle Blog2017-10-19T17:51:36Zhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/feed/atom/WordPress36.964167-122.017778http://www.cyclelicio.us/images/cyclelicious-bike-shop.jpgCyclelicioushttps://feedburner.google.comSubscribe with My Yahoo!Subscribe with FeedlySubscribe with SubToMeSubscribe with BloglinesSubscribe with NetvibesSubscribe with My AOLSubscribe with PageflakesSubscribe with GoogleSubscribe with NewsGatorSubscribe with PlusmoAdd to Any Feed ReaderThis is an XML content feed. It is intended to be viewed in a newsreader or syndicated to another site, subject to copyright and fair use.Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/Input needed TODAY for VTA 3 bike rack proposalshttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=362022017-10-19T17:51:36Z2017-10-19T17:51:36ZIn June 2017, the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) Board of Directors approved a contract with a vendor to provide three-position exterior bike racks for their bus fleet. The award has been contested, and VTA is required to conduct a new procurement process. Individuals who were previously involved in the prior procurement process are read more »

In June 2017, the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) Board of Directors approved a contract with a vendor to provide three-position exterior bike racks for their bus fleet. The award has been contested, and VTA is required to conduct a new procurement process. Individuals who were previously involved in the prior procurement process are not permitted to participate in this new procurement process. This includes anyone who provided comment on the previously approved design and vendor.

IMG_0312

If you have not provided comment before, you are invited to review and comment on sample three-position racks TODAY, Thursday, October 19 2017, from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM at the Cerone Bus Yard, 3990 Zanker Road, San Jose, CA 95134. Find the sample racks at the flagpole at this remote bus yard up by 237 on Zanker Road in north San Jose.

0http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/input-needed-today-for-vta-3-bike-rack-proposals/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/San Jose Ribbon Cutting: Story & Sunset Cycle Track & Bike Signalhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=361952017-08-30T19:00:58Z2017-08-29T22:39:52ZNew 2-way #cycletrack Sunset at Story. The bike detector in the pavement triggers a bike signal. #cycling A post shared by Richard Masoner (@cyclelicious) on Aug 29, 2017 at 6:13pm PDT Check out the new two-way cycle track and bike signal for Sunset Avenue & Hopkins Drive at Story Road, San Jose, California during the read more »

New 2-way #cycletrack Sunset at Story. The bike detector in the pavement triggers a bike signal. #cycling

A post shared by Richard Masoner (@cyclelicious) on

Check out the new two-way cycle track and bike signal for Sunset Avenue & Hopkins Drive at Story Road, San Jose, California during the ribbon cutting ceremony this Thursday, August 31, 2017 at 6 P.M.

San Jose Sunset Hopkins cycletrack grand opening

Background

Sunset Avenue provides a north-sound connection across I-680 free of the high speed highway access ramp just north of Story Road. Other nearby crossings either have freeway ramps or, in the case of Highway 101, the crossing is completely inaccessible to cyclists and pedestrians.

Southbound cyclists at Story Road, however, cannot easily make the dogleg turn to Hopkins. The median on Story Road prevents left turns from Sunset. This engineering change normalizes what cyclists already practice to get across a tricky intersection.

Click here for Google Maps of this location. See previous discussion here.

1http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/san-jose-ribbon-cutting-story-sunset-cycle-track-bike-signal/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/Big Sur bike explorations this Saturdayhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=358902017-08-11T18:13:06Z2017-08-09T20:17:40ZUpdate: We’ll meet 8:30 A.M. at Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park parking lot, and bike roughly 20 miles to Paul’s Slide before turning around. Big Sur Taphouse near Pfeiffer Bridge is open for business and is a good place to stop for food and drink after the ride. Pace will likely be closer to 12 read more »

Update: We’ll meet 8:30 A.M. at Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park parking lot, and bike roughly 20 miles to Paul’s Slide before turning around. Big Sur Taphouse near Pfeiffer Bridge is open for business and is a good place to stop for food and drink after the ride. Pace will likely be closer to 12 MPH rather than 15 MPH.

Highway 1 across a large chunk of the California Central Coast will remain closed over the summer after extensive damage from last winter’s storms, closing off the incredibly scenic Big Sur coastal route. Several people have already taken advantage of a walking path across Pfeiffer Gorge that opened to the public on July 1, allowing them to bike 20 miles down the coast on a mostly car-free coast highway. I plan to take this trip on Saturday, August 12, and you’re welcome to join me. Caltrans says Pfeiffer Bridge will open to traffic in September, so this is pretty close to your last opportunity to ride this without sharing the road with heavy tourist traffic.

Highway 1 closed Big Sur

The Plan

Who What When Where How: Saturday, August 12, 2017. We’ll meet at the Molera State Park parking lot at 8:15 A.M. Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park parking lot at 8:30 A.M., unload bikes and ride the five miles to Pfeiffer Bridge. We’ll carry bikes a quarter mile on a packed dirt trail to get to the other side of the gorge and get into the isolated part of Highway 1, where we can enjoy a Highway 1 along the coast with local traffic only. It’s about 20 miles to the next slide, so plan on 50 miles of round trip riding, with sight-seeing and other explorations along the way. Bring cash to support the struggling local vendors who normally depend on motorized tourist traffic.

Catch a ride with me! I have space for three bikes on my car; I’m pretty sure two of those spaces are taken, but feel free to ping me if you’d like a ride with me from Scotts Valley. You can even crash on my couch Friday night after Santa Cruz Bike Party, although no overnight parking is available. I will leave my home in Scotts Valley at 6:30 A.M. Leave a comment and I’ll email you with details.

RSVP: If you plan to meet me either at Molera or at my home, please let me know by Friday afternoon so I know to look for you, and pretty please send me a note if you flake. Leave a comment here, and I’ll send you an email with my mobile number so we can text updates. You can also contact me via DM on Twitter. Important: Cell phone reception can by iffy south of about Carmel, so be sure to send any status updates before you get out of Monterey, and be sure you send them before I’m south of there too.

What’s our pace? This is no rider left behind, and ideally I’m aiming for an endurance pace AKA 70% HR exertion level AKA a casual conversational ride but with noticeable exertion, which for me translates to about a 15 MPH pace for most of the 50 miles we’re riding. We’ll likely do frequent stops for photo opportunities and anything interesting we might see.

What to bring? Bring water and snacks and cash. Bring your bike. Don’t forget your bike shoes. Please ensure your bike is in good operating order before arriving at the parking lot at Molera Park. As for apparel, the temperature should be in the mid-60s along the coast in Big Sur, rising to the mid-70s towards noon depending on how foggy it is.

Why so early? Highway 1 north of Monterey gets very busy on the weekends. I’d like to avoid that. Prevailing north wind also picks up significantly after noon along the coast, so I’d like to avoid that too with an early start.

The Background

The drought-busting winter storms earlier this year damaged significant portions of the state highway system in California, washing out several sections of Highway 1 along the Central Coast and taking out Pfeiffer Bridge in Monterey County, isolating the residents and businesses there. They’re receiving basic living needs by helicopter, or by hauling supplies in on the backs of porters using hastily constructed walking trails. We’re using one of these trails to access this “island”, as described by Alpha Roaming on his recent trip to this same area.

Here is Caltrans District 5 current highway closure information for this part of Highway 1. We’ll ride from Pfeiffer to Paul’s Slide.

Caltrans District 5 Highway 1 Big Sur road closures / work

More background – historical

When Pfeiffer Bridge was first knocked out, I jotted these below notes while researching alternate routes for people who might need to bypass Highway 1 completely, e.g. large groups, and those touring the coast.

Brian Coyne‏ (Bay Area Biking Blog guy) suggests State Route 25 from Hollister, see also this route at https://ridewithgps.com/routes/19172332. Brian said he would also try this route through the Central Valley.

Lodging for inland routes:
– Hearst Hacienda at Fort Hunter Ligget (open to public, call to reserve room). Camping around Lake Nacimiento.
– San Lorenzo Park Campground King City
– Queen Motel King City
– Memorial Park Campground Greenfield
– Camping at Pinnacles National Monument
– Campgrounds on east side of Big Sur State Park near Arroyo Seco Road (near-ish Greenfield)
– Williams Hill Recreation Area San Ardo – ATV area w/ FREE camping, 5 mile steep dirt road to access. No water, no trash.
– Cabins and camping around Lake Nacimiento & Lake San Antonio
– Lodging and camping near Paso Robles

@cyclelicious @kleen @BrianCBikes @skip_sf besides bridge, two other serious problem areas, one getting worse by the day-Mud Creek & Paul's

— bigsurkate (@bigsurkate) March 15, 2017

ACA Route Addendum for 2017

ACA member discussion on re-route around Big Sur

New Pfeiffer Bridge approved . Caltrans says this bridge will open to traffic (likely single-lane) in September.

2http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/big-sur-bike-explorations-this-saturday/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/San Jose Pop Up Bikewayshttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=361762017-08-02T20:12:46Z2017-08-02T20:12:46ZThe city of San Jose will demonstrate two-way pop up protected bikeways along 4th Street across downtown from San Salvador Street to St James Street next Monday afternoon. Volunteers under the direction of city staff will pop up temporary protected bike lanes of different types on both sides of 4th – all between St. James read more »

The city of San Jose will demonstrate two-way pop up protected bikeways along 4th Street across downtown from San Salvador Street to St James Street next Monday afternoon.

San Jose Popup Bike Lanes 4th Street

Volunteers under the direction of city staff will pop up temporary protected bike lanes of different types on both sides of 4th – all between St. James and San Salvador, allowing them to try different things on different sides of the street. They use spray chalk, planters, cones and other objects to create these temporary bikeways.

SVBC plans a group ride on these lanes either the evening of Friday August 11, or Saturday morning on August 12. Stay tuned for details after they’re ironed out.

For more, visit the Facebook event page: Pop-Up Bikeway in Downtown San José.

1http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/san-jose-pop-up-bikeways/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/Today I Learned about “Watching Eyes” and bike thefthttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=361702017-08-01T15:57:37Z2017-08-01T15:57:37ZYesterday’s episode of Sci Show Psych with Hank Green discussed the Watching Eyes Effect, in which people act differently when there’s a picture of eyes in plain view. Hank caught my attention when he mentioned that pictures of eyes result in things like fewer bike thefts. Hello! I immediately thought that we can post photos read more »

Yesterday’s episode of Sci Show Psych with Hank Green discussed the Watching Eyes Effect, in which people act differently when there’s a picture of eyes in plain view.

Hank caught my attention when he mentioned that pictures of eyes result in things like fewer bike thefts. Hello!

watching3

I immediately thought that we can post photos of faces near bike lockers and other bike parking locations that are subject to theft. A Google search quickly led me numerous references to this study at Newcastle University in England. The researchers monitored bike theft reports on the campus for 12 months, then posted durable signs at three locations, with the “numerous other locations” left as controls.

Watching Eyes Effect and bike theft

The study found thefts decreased 62% at the “We’re Watching You” locations, but increased 65% at the controls, suggesting the signs displaced the bad behavior.

I wonder if this trick can work if I paste googly eyes to my bike frame?

1http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/today-i-learned-about-watching-eyes-and-bike-theft/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/I don’t care if Monday’s bluehttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=361622017-07-31T19:19:16Z2017-07-31T18:28:44ZHi all and … Monday. Apologies for the extended radio silence. I’m trying to force a cycling metaphor into love but I’m not sure it works. Cycling to the top of a mountain range is painfully slow, grinding hard work and, frankly, not a lot of fun. Experiencing your personal King of the Mountain feels read more »

Hi all and … Monday. Apologies for the extended radio silence.

I’m trying to force a cycling metaphor into love but I’m not sure it works. Cycling to the top of a mountain range is painfully slow, grinding hard work and, frankly, not a lot of fun. Experiencing your personal King of the Mountain feels great, and the descent that follows is fast and exhilarating.

Love also builds slowly towards euphoria. The swift descent from the mountain top happens stunningly fast; unlike with cycling, however, this descent is far from rewarding.

News and Events

A buddy of mine saw this cyclist fatality in San Jose last Saturday. 26-year-old Paul Candeleria rode his bike across the intersection of Race and Parkmoor when he was struck by a VTA light rail train. This occurred a mile and a half from Stokes Street in San Jose, where 14-year-old Danika Garcia was struck by a train on the same Winchester line in 2014. I think this is our third cyclist fatality of 2017 in San Jose. The first occurred last March at Leigh & Coit when a driver struck a guy on a bicycle; while the second occurred on Quimby Road while the cyclist descended from Mount Hamilton after watching the Amgen Tour of California. My condolences to all involved.


The city of San Jose invites you to community roundtable and happy hour events next week to discuss bikeways.

San Jose bikeway community meetings 2017

“Community Roundtable: Street Design & Bike Network” takes place 5:30pm-7:00pm, Wednesday, August 9, 2017 in the San Jose City Hall Rotunda, 200 E. Santa Clara Street. Check here for more info and RSVP. More information on the Happy Hour event can be found here.

A little birdy tells me the city of San Jose plans to demo a two-way cycletrack on 4th Street in downtown San Jose for one week, either this week or next. I presume this will be in the parking-protected bikeway between San Carlos and San Fernando along the SJSU campus. I and many others believe this should have been two-way from the start.

I admit as an irrelevant old fart that tattoos kind of a turn-off for me. This research showing that tattoos might hinder sweating has me thinking of a new, practical use: can we tat our underarms in lieu of a lifetime of antiperspirant application? How much would that hurt, and for how long? (H/T Hannah).

.

I’m currently reading Holy Spokes on the spirituality of cycling. I’ll let you know what I think later.

San Jose Bike Train rolls Wednesday morning, August 2, 2017. Departing 8:15 from Bel Bacio Cafe in San Jose’s Little Italy, serving destinations in North San Jose along the Guadalupe River Trail. We might change the start time to 8:00; I’d love to know your opinion on this.

0http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/i-dont-care-if-mondays-blue-2/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/Vision Zero Forum in Santa Cruz – June 29, 2017http://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=361432017-06-09T20:38:19Z2017-06-09T20:37:59ZLeah Shahum, Founder and Executive Director of the Vision Zero Network, will speak at the Vision Zero forum hosted by the Santa Cruz County Community Traffic Safety and Santa Cruz County Public Health on Thursday, June 29, 2017. The event begins 4 PM at the Simpkins Swim Center, 979 17th Ave, Santa Cruz, CA. Vision read more »

Leah Shahum, Founder and Executive Director of the Vision Zero Network, will speak at the Vision Zero forum hosted by the Santa Cruz County Community Traffic Safety and Santa Cruz County Public Health on Thursday, June 29, 2017.

Vision Zero Forum Santa Cruz County California 2017

The event begins 4 PM at the Simpkins Swim Center, 979 17th Ave, Santa Cruz, CA.

Vision Zero seeks to eliminate all deaths and serious injuries due to traffic collisions. 343 people have died in Santa Cruz County from 2006 through 2016 in 182 collisions, of whom 39 victims were pedestrians, and 16 were riding bicycles. Seven California cities — Sacramento, San Francisco, Fremont, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, Los Angeles, and San Diego — have adopted some kind of Vision Zero policy to reduce traffic fatalities.

RSVP to this event by visiting the Santa Cruz Vision Zero Forum online survey. Simpkins Swim Center is located behind Shoreline Middle School on 17th Avenue between Brommer Street and Portola Drive. Santa Cruz Metro Bus 66 through Live Oak serves this area with 60 to 90 minute headways until about 9 PM.

0http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/vision-zero-forum-in-santa-cruz-june-29-2017/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/San Jose Kooser Road safety improvements meetinghttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=361322017-06-01T18:41:55Z2017-06-01T18:41:55ZSan Jose DOT will repave Kooser Road from Camden Avenue to Blossom Hill Road later in 2017. As part of the pavement project, the City of San Jose DOT plans a 4-3 lane reduction between Camden and Meridian. The community can give their input on these plans at a community meeting Tuesday, June 6th, 2017, read more »

San Jose DOT will repave Kooser Road from Camden Avenue to Blossom Hill Road later in 2017. As part of the pavement project, the City of San Jose DOT plans a 4-3 lane reduction between Camden and Meridian. The community can give their input on these plans at a community meeting Tuesday, June 6th, 2017, 7:00 – 8:30 pm, at Vineland Branch Library, 1450 Blossom Hill Road, San Jose, CA.

Kooser Road San Jose safety improvements project

Kooser is currently four lanes between Camden and Blossom Hill, with no bike lanes, and street parking on both sides west of Meridian. After repaving, the city plans to re-stripe Kooser to three lanes between Camden and Meridian, with bike lanes for the entire length of Kooser on both sides of the street.

City of San Jose DOT says these changes will improve Safety by decreasing vehicle speeds, improving safety for motor vehicles turning in and out of driveways and to and from side streets, decreasing the number of lanes that must be crossed when walking across the street, and adding bike lanes; provide safe(r) routes to schools, namely for Lietz Elementary School and Dartmouth Middle School; improve neighborhood livability by calming traffic and creating a more comfortable environment to walk and bike; and leverage resources by implementing with the City’s annual pavement maintenance program.

There are currently no good east-west bike corridors in this part of San Jose; the nearest east-west bike route that’s reasonably connected to anything is Curtner Avenue three miles to the north. I’m an aggressive rider, but I personally avoid this part of San Jose because biking here can be extremely unpleasant. Even the Strava global heatmap shows Kooser (the east-west road highlighted in the map below) is not a popular route.

Kooser Road cycling heat map

Still, people need to get around, even in car-dependent Kooser + Dartmouth neighborhoods in San Jose’s District 9, represented by Donald Rocha. SWITRS shows five collisions involving a cyclist and another six involving pedestrians on Kooser Road from 2006 through 2016.

Kooser Road cycling / pedestrian collisions SWITRS 2006-2016

We see another five cyclists were injured in the same time period on nearby Blossom Hill Road, along with three pedestrians, one of which was a fatality.

The four-three lane reduction is warranted because Kooser has low traffic volumes and high speeds with a history of collisions. Four to five traffic collisions are reported on Kooser every year.

Several years ago the city tried to replace street parking with bike lanes on Kooser; the residents shot it down. Hopefully the residents might be more amenable to reducing lane capacity on Kooser; it can’t be pleasant living on a street with 50 MPH traffic zooming past. Still, a few voices speaking up for active transportation in South San Jose can’t hurt if you can make it.

1http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/san-jose-kooser-road-safety-improvements-meeting/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/Pushback on Caltrans proposal to close Skyline in Daly Cityhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=360992017-06-08T20:21:08Z2017-05-16T19:34:26ZUpdate June 8, 2017: Your emails and phone calls made a difference; Caltrans District 4 had originally planned to install “bikes prohibited” signs on a portion of Skyline Boulevard through Daly City, California, but relented after several people who use this route told Caltrans that the suggested alternate routes on local roads are not acceptable. read more »

Update June 8, 2017: Your emails and phone calls made a difference; Caltrans District 4 had originally planned to install “bikes prohibited” signs on a portion of Skyline Boulevard through Daly City, California, but relented after several people who use this route told Caltrans that the suggested alternate routes on local roads are not acceptable. Although Caltrans does not have a public input process when deciding bike access on state highways, the District quickly created an ad hoc method after meeting with cycling advocates from both local and state advocacy groups.

Caltrans District 4 now seeks input from those who bicycle or are interested in bicycling on the freeway segment of State Route (SR) 35, Skyline Boulevard, across the Highway 1 interchange, or along the SR 35 corridor using local streets between Daly City and Pacifica. Please take a moment to fill out this online survey and share the link with others who may be interested. This targeted survey will help inform Caltrans in developing both short and long term strategies for people bicycling along this corridor. The survey will be available until June 25, 2017.

Find the survey at https://goo.gl/forms/zmUejriBGtBLYJzq1

Read below for the original story and background.


Caltrans District 4, which covers the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, celebrates Bike Month by banning bikes from the primary bikeway connecting the Pacific Coast side of San Francisco with the Peninsula. The hundreds of people who bike this way every week complain to the District. Let’s hope they listen.

I buried the lede on this story earlier, so allow me to make amends: Caltrans District 4 Office of Traffic decided to ban bikes from a portion of Skyline Boulevard (aka California State Route 35) in Daly City where Skyline has an interchange with Highway 1. The All Powerful Bike Lobby has pushed back, and maybe Caltrans will rescind this decision?

Update: Caltrans D4 met with Shiloh Ballard and Emma Shlaes of Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition, Janice Li of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, and Daly City’s public works director. Caltrans agreed to hold off on the bike ban and to take stakeholder suggestions on ways to improve this interchange. Watch this space for further details. In the meantime, read the full update here from SVBC policy director Emma Shlaes.

Background

Skyline Boulevard is the primary bikeway connecting the Pacific Coast side of San Francisco with the Peninsula. Passing through Daly City, cyclists must traverse a highway style interchange with Highway 1, but people who routinely travel here say they go this way because it’s better than other nearby routes for several reasons, including personal comfort and safety. Because of this interchange’s proximity to I-280, very few motorists take the ramp from 35 to 1 and vice versa. Regular riders say they have to negotiate the merge very rarely if ever when they ride here.

Unfortunately, somebody died while cycling at this location in July of 2015, and litigation in that fatality is pending. The best way to limit liability from cyclists is to design facilities for cyclists ban cyclists, and never mind how much danger and inconvenience this creates for us on the surface streets that are not under Caltrans control.

The pace of this decision to ban and implementation has been rushed due this these liability concerns. Yesterday morning, Caltrans D4 Bike Coordinator Sergio Ruiz learned of this pending closure and spread the word. Sergio’s office had nothing to do with this decision to ban bikes but was merely the bearer of bad news after the fact. “Bikes Prohibited” signs are scheduled to go up by the end of May. Happy Bike Month from Caltrans, you all!

Backlash

After Sergio posted the bad news, he quickly received email and phone calls from dozens of people outlining the reasons this bike ban is a bad idea. CABO and SVBC both immediately registered their strong objections to Caltrans.

Skyline Blvd Daly City bikes banned

Caltrans D4 Bike Coordinator Sergio Ruiz met this morning with the Office of Traffic personnel who made this decision, and has forwarded along the objections that have already been received. I hope he can successfully convey the reasons the Office of Traffic made a bad decision.

Why do those crazy cyclists bike there?

This is more than about access to a public road. There’s a truism in bike facilities usage: We tend to ride on the best available facility. If we prefer to ride on a high speed expressway with freeway style interchanges, the nearby surface streets must be pretty bad.

Bikes on Skyline Blvd Google Streetview

Besides anecdotal evidence from people who travel across Daly City on their commutes, we can look at Strava. The Strava heatmap for this area shows about equal use between Skyline Boulevard and Skyline Drive , a surface street immediately to the west of the expressway and mostly parallel. Comparing Strava “segments,” we see 165 recorded their rides along Highway 35 over the past couple of weeks, versus 105 on Skyline Drive.

Let’s look at the bicycle collision heatmap as generated from SWITRS data from 2006 through 2016. SWITRS records five crashes involving cyclists on Skyline at Highway 1, one of which was our fatality, and one more that was a collision with a “fixed object.” The crash heatmap also shows collisions on the alternate routes recommended by Caltrans Office of Traffic, which up to now have less bicycle traffic than Skyline Blvd. The top map shows the 125 collisions involving cyclists in all of Daly City; I zoom into the Skyline / Hwy 1 interchange for the second heat map.

SWITRS bicycle crash heatmap 2006-2016 Daly City CA

switrs-dalycity2

Besides the increased exposure to danger on these surface streets, the alternate routes recommended by the Caltrans Office of Traffic involve significant elevation, left turns across busy intersections, and very steep grades that are, frankly, unridable for casual riders. A few of us were amused to see Caltrans Office of Traffic recommend St Francis Drive as an alternate. This route takes you past a gate to a private driveway through an apartment complex.

Check out this intersection where northbound cyclists must make the turn on the proscribed alternate route. Good luck making that left turn across four lanes of heavy, fast traffic during the evening rush hour! Thank you Caltrans D4 for your concern for our safety!

Send your concerns to Caltrans D4 bike coordinator sergio.ruiz@dot.ca.gov – he wants to receive your concerns and forward them to the Powers That Be in the Office of Traffic which is ultimately responsible for this decision. If you know people at Caltrans D4 or Caltrans HQ, now is the time to let them know how uniformed this decision is.

H/T to Murph for bringing this to my attention. Thank you also to Sergio Ruiz and Emma Shlaes for additional background. Bike prohibition map provided by Caltrans. Map data: Google, DigitalGlobe.

10http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/pushback-on-caltrans-proposal-to-close-skyline-in-daly-city/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/Tuesday night in Santa Clara: trails and other bike discussionhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=361032017-05-16T05:23:17Z2017-05-16T03:17:01ZFrom Betsy M regarding City of Santa Clara council meeting the evening of Tuesday, May 17 16, 2017. There’s a council meeting tomorrow night in Santa Clara (which is a schedule conflict with the Plan Bay Area meeting in San Jose’s King Library). There’s a creek trail extension in item 13. B. 3. in the read more »

From Betsy M regarding City of Santa Clara council meeting the evening of Tuesday, May 17 16, 2017.

There’s a council meeting tomorrow night in Santa Clara (which is a schedule conflict with the Plan Bay Area meeting in San Jose’s King Library).

There’s a creek trail extension in item 13. B. 3. in the consent agenda. It is the evaluation only (no shovels or asphalt yet) of remaining portions of the Saratoga, Calabazas, and Hetch Hetchy trails in Santa Clara. Follow the attachment link from the city’s website to see the lengthy PDF.

http://sireweb.santaclaraca.gov/sirepub/mtgviewer.aspx?meetid=1978&doctype=AGENDA

Things on the consent calendar usually just get passed, which is fine. If there’s anything to do here, it’s to remind the council and the consultants to talk to their own BPAC, to the bicycle community, and to SVBC while planning these trails. The other thing I see missing in the document is anything about connection and continuity. The J.W. Christian Greenbelt runs along the Hetch Hetchy corridor in Sunnyvale. Calabazas creek is the shared border between Santa Clara and Sunnyvale. VTA has a bike plan, which I don’t see mentioned in this document, but which is directed at intercity connectivity. (Santa Clara’s own bicycle plan dates to 2009 and has so far been all but ignored.)

I also see no mention of improving connections to these trail corridors on adjoining city streets, or of the various agencies which might someday collaborate or provide funding (Open Space Authority, Air Quality Management District, MTC, etc.).

Further down in the council agenda, there’s also yet another information item on the San Tomas trail closure, with not a lot of detail on what information might be presented. For all this item has been discussed, there doesn’t seem to have been much effort to reach out to SVBC or to the trail users to identify a better alternative.

San Tomas Aquino closure schedule 2016

Tuesday’s meeting begins at 4 PM with a closed session, reconvening with a public meeting beginning at 5 PM. The public presentation portion begins after the consent calendar so my guess is you can probably show up around 6 and still be on time to give your comments.

Speaking of San Tomas Trail closures, the trail will close to the public at 1 PM on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 for the U2 Joshua Tree Tour. Does Bono still ride a bike after his serious crash in 2014?

0http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/tuesday-night-in-santa-clara-trails-and-other-bike-discussion/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/Wonky bike policy, a bike train, and a bike racehttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=360892017-05-15T19:53:40Z2017-05-15T19:48:05ZAmgen Tour of California Women’s Race ended on Mothers’ Day with Olympic Gold Medalist Anna van der Breggen of the Netherlands narrowly edging ahead of local favorite Katie Hall during the 4th Stage circuit race in Sacrmento. The Amgen Tour of California Men’s Race continues today with a finish in San Jose. Watch live on read more »

Amgen Tour of California Women’s Race ended on Mothers’ Day with Olympic Gold Medalist Anna van der Breggen of the Netherlands narrowly edging ahead of local favorite Katie Hall during the 4th Stage circuit race in Sacrmento.

The Amgen Tour of California Men’s Race continues today with a finish in San Jose. Watch live on the Tour Tracker. Unlike every previous year of this race, I will attend any of the stages in person.

Note: San Jose Bike Train rolls this Wednesday morning, departing 8:15 A.M. from Bel Bacio Cafe. Find more events below the photo of the Movers and Shakers Ride on the Bike Train route last Thursday.

Movers and Shakers Ride Thursday May 11 2017

7 PM TONIGHT in Burlingame, CA: City council discusses Complete Streets. Agenda here [PDF]

City of San Mateo: Two meetings for Highway 101 interchange project this week. More background at Streetsblog.

Cupertino: “Building a Healthier Community through Active Transportation”, 8 AM to Noon, Tuesday, May 16 2017. More info and RSVP here.

Scotts Valley: Bike Santa Cruz County and Ecology Action will be at the Scotts Valley City Council meeting on May 17th to ask for a protected bike lane pilot project and Safe Routes to School program funding.

[ Ad ] Historical fiction for children: Germany’s World War 2 invasion of France interrupts a boy’s dreams to race the Tour de France, but maybe he can use his bicycle to help a family in trouble.
Book : The Bicycle Spy

Caltrans District 4 Bicycle Plan Meetings continue May 17 2017 in Vallejo and May 30 2017 in San Jose. Workshop flyer here. Caltrans D4 covers the nine county Bay Area. You can also provide input at the D4 Bike Plan Survey.

Speaking of Caltrans D4 — this is along the Pacific Coast side of Daly City:

@cyclelicious @fogindex @CPbike @Ygduf So apparently caltrans is going to close CA-35 (skyline) from Westmoor to Hickey to cyclists in 2 wks

— murphstahoe (@murphstahoe) May 15, 2017

Here’s the notice:

This is to notify you that Caltrans District 4 Office of Traffic Safety is pursuing a bicycle prohibition on the State Route 35 freeway interchange with State Route 1 between Hickey Boulevard to Westmoor Avenue due to the number of ramps in each direction and number of lanes bicyclists need to merge across with motorists traveling at freeway speeds. Alternate routes are available to bicyclists on the local network via Skyline Dr./Gateway Dr. to the west of Route 35 and Southgate Ave/St. Francis Blvd/Callan Blvd. to the east. Signs will be installed in the next couple weeks alerting bicyclists of the freeway prohibition.

San Jose: VTA “Story-Keyes Complete Streets Corridor Study Community Workshop,” 6 PM, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. Emma Prusch Park Meeting Hall, 647 King Rd, San Jose, CA 95116. Background study information here.

San Jose: VTA “Bascom Complete Streets Study Public Meetings,” two meetings in June 2017. More information here.

Initiative filed to repeal California’s brand new increase in the gasoline tax.

H/T to Emma, Jaimie, Moira, Murph and Sergio for this information.

1http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/wonky-bike-policy-a-bike-train-and-a-bike-race/Richard Masonerhttp://www.cyclelicio.us/Bike culture at Adobe Systemshttp://www.cyclelicio.us/?p=360832017-05-10T23:42:36Z2017-05-10T23:10:13ZSal Pizarro writes about the 250 Adobe employees who make 1600 trips each month by bike at Adobe’s headquarters in downtown San Jose. He mentions some of the ways Adobe encourages bike commuting for their workers, but he missed what I think is the key element: Adobe’s decision in the 1990s to build a million read more »

Sal Pizarro writes about the 250 Adobe employees who make 1600 trips each month by bike at Adobe’s headquarters in downtown San Jose.

Adobe Building

He mentions some of the ways Adobe encourages bike commuting for their workers, but he missed what I think is the key element: Adobe’s decision in the 1990s to build a million square feet of office space in three high rise towers in downtown San Jose, California, which contrasts sharply with the sprawling horizontal office park campuses of most Silicon Valley businesses. It’s a little far from high frequency transit to call Adobe’s location transit-oriented, but the towers are within very easy bike distance of Caltrain, light rail, and the downtown transit malls.

Pizarro says to “give Adobe workers extra credit for navigating downtown streets and traffic.” And, yeah, sure, it could be much better, but riding across downtown where bikes are faster than cars sure beats sharing the road with 50 MPH traffic typical of the suburban parts of Silicon Valley. The Guadalupe River Trail — an important bike commute route — connects directly to Adobe, and is patrolled by Adobe private security.

Incentives like food and bike subsidies are good ways to demonstrate your company’s commitment to helping bike commuters, but if you really want to make a difference, locate your fast growing business near transit and bike facilities.

Pizarro’s article in the Merc-News: Adobe puts bike-riding employees on the right path. If you want to check things out for yourself, swing by the Fehr and Peers Bike to Work Day Energizer Station on Thursday morning, located on San Fernando Street immediately west of Adobe Systems. The Google Streetview I embedded above looks towards Adobe from San Fernando Street.

1http://www.cyclelicio.us/2017/bike-culture-at-adobe/